Pause for Thought

Dear Friends,

Dear Friends,
The Editor has bribed me to write what may perhaps be the first-ever secular
Muse.
Although I have no faith, and see no need to acquire any, I do believe (that
word again!) in something that may best be the called the spiritual
dimension. Life is full of wonders and mysteries – why for instance are there
so many varieties of bird, and why are they so “unnecessarily” colourful? –
but I’m more than content not to seek an explanation for it all. Maybe I’m
some kind of pantheist, but I’m in danger of sounding like a theologian –
heaven forbid!
Actually, I’m happy to be writing this for purely human reasons, because I’ve
always been struck by how welcome I feel on those occasions when I do
attend a service or a church event. Everyone seems to be accepted for who
they are, regardless of their beliefs and opinions. It’s good to see the care
and concern you all show for one another’s health and welfare, something
that has been all the more in evidence during these horrible months of the
virus. I sense that your church is even more of a community than before the
pandemic.
So, from the outside looking in, I hope you will permit me to say to you all
“May the spirit be with you.”
Tony Clark

[Thanks to Tony for standing in at the 11th hour when the contributor pulled
out. The bribe was easy – kippers for Saturday lunch and a home-baked
lemon yoghurt cake! – Editor]

Dear Friends,
The Editor has bribed me to write what may perhaps be the first-ever secular
Muse.
Although I have no faith, and see no need to acquire any, I do believe (that
word again!) in something that may best be the called the spiritual
dimension. Life is full of wonders and mysteries – why for instance are there
so many varieties of bird, and why are they so “unnecessarily” colourful? –
but I’m more than content not to seek an explanation for it all. Maybe I’m
some kind of pantheist, but I’m in danger of sounding like a theologian –
heaven forbid!
Actually, I’m happy to be writing this for purely human reasons, because I’ve
always been struck by how welcome I feel on those occasions when I do
attend a service or a church event. Everyone seems to be accepted for who
they are, regardless of their beliefs and opinions. It’s good to see the care
and concern you all show for one another’s health and welfare, something
that has been all the more in evidence during these horrible months of the
virus. I sense that your church is even more of a community than before the
pandemic.
So, from the outside looking in, I hope you will permit me to say to you all
“May the spirit be with you.”
Tony Clark

[Thanks to Tony for standing in at the 11th hour when the contributor pulled
out. The bribe was easy – kippers for Saturday lunch and a home-baked
lemon yoghurt cake! – Editor]

Dear Friends,
The Editor has bribed me to write what may perhaps be the first-ever secular
Muse.
Although I have no faith, and see no need to acquire any, I do believe (that
word again!) in something that may best be the called the spiritual
dimension. Life is full of wonders and mysteries – why for instance are there
so many varieties of bird, and why are they so “unnecessarily” colourful? –
but I’m more than content not to seek an explanation for it all. Maybe I’m
some kind of pantheist, but I’m in danger of sounding like a theologian –
heaven forbid!
Actually, I’m happy to be writing this for purely human reasons, because I’ve
always been struck by how welcome I feel on those occasions when I do
attend a service or a church event. Everyone seems to be accepted for who
they are, regardless of their beliefs and opinions. It’s good to see the care
and concern you all show for one another’s health and welfare, something
that has been all the more in evidence during these horrible months of the
virus. I sense that your church is even more of a community than before the
pandemic.
So, from the outside looking in, I hope you will permit me to say to you all
“May the spirit be with you.”
Tony Clark

[Thanks to Tony for standing in at the 11th hour when the contributor pulled
out. The bribe was easy – kippers for Saturday lunch and a home-baked
lemon yoghurt cake! – Editor]

Dear Friends,
The Editor has bribed me to write what may perhaps be the first-ever secular
Muse.
Although I have no faith, and see no need to acquire any, I do believe (that
word again!) in something that may best be the called the spiritual
dimension. Life is full of wonders and mysteries – why for instance are there
so many varieties of bird, and why are they so “unnecessarily” colourful? –
but I’m more than content not to seek an explanation for it all. Maybe I’m
some kind of pantheist, but I’m in danger of sounding like a theologian –
heaven forbid!
Actually, I’m happy to be writing this for purely human reasons, because I’ve
always been struck by how welcome I feel on those occasions when I do
attend a service or a church event. Everyone seems to be accepted for who
they are, regardless of their beliefs and opinions. It’s good to see the care
and concern you all show for one another’s health and welfare, something
that has been all the more in evidence during these horrible months of the
virus. I sense that your church is even more of a community than before the
pandemic.
So, from the outside looking in, I hope you will permit me to say to you all
“May the spirit be with you.”
Tony Clark

[Thanks to Tony for standing in at the 11th hour when the contributor pulled
out. The bribe was easy – kippers for Saturday lunch and a home-baked
lemon yoghurt cake! – Editor]

Dear Friends,

The Editor has bribed me to write what may perhaps be the first-ever secular
Muse.
Although I have no faith, and see no need to acquire any, I do believe (that
word again!) in something that may best be the called the spiritual
dimension. Life is full of wonders and mysteries – why for instance are there
so many varieties of bird, and why are they so “unnecessarily” colourful? –
but I’m more than content not to seek an explanation for it all. Maybe I’m
some kind of pantheist, but I’m in danger of sounding like a theologian –
heaven forbid!
Actually, I’m happy to be writing this for purely human reasons, because I’ve
always been struck by how welcome I feel on those occasions when I do
attend a service or a church event. Everyone seems to be accepted for who
they are, regardless of their beliefs and opinions. It’s good to see the care
and concern you all show for one another’s health and welfare, something
that has been all the more in evidence during these horrible months of the
virus. I sense that your church is even more of a community than before the
pandemic.
So, from the outside looking in, I hope you will permit me to say to you all
“May the spirit be with you.”

Tony Clark

[Thanks to Tony for standing in at the 11th hour when the contributor pulled
out. The bribe was easy – kippers for Saturday lunch and a home-baked
lemon yoghurt cake! – Editor]